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Florida Bar Lawyer Regulations
Florida Maximum Amount Lawyer Can Charge For Services

Florida Bar Lawyer Regulations - Florida Maximum Amount Lawyer Can Charge For Services - Cruise Laws

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Florida Maximum Amount Lawyer Can Charge For Services

Florida Bar Lawyer Regulations, Maximum Amount Lawyer Can Charge For Services - Cruise Laws

Florida Bar Regulations For Attorney Fees

Most cruise lines sailing out of U.S. cruise ship ports require lawsuit filing in the state of Florida. Since the majority of lawsuits involving the cruise industry are filing in Florida, choosing a lawyer is a very important issue. The Florida Bar has a wide range of free public access records to assist with finding a lawyer and steering away from lawyers who have a recorded history of Florida Bar discipline action. Below is the accepted fee schedule for all Florida Bar registered lawyers.
Florida Bar Regulation: Rule 4-1.5 Fees And Costs For Legal Services

(A) The contract shall contain the following provisions:
(i) "The undersigned client has, before signing this contract, received and read the statement of client’s rights and understands each of the rights set forth therein. The undersigned client has signed the statement and received a signed copy to refer to while being represented by the undersigned attorney(s)."

(ii) "This contract may be cancelled by written notification to the attorney at any time within 3 business days of the date the contract was signed, as shown below, and if cancelled the client shall not be obligated to pay any fees to the attorney for the work performed during that time. If the attorney has advanced funds to others in representation of the client, the attorney is entitled to be reimbursed for such amounts as the attorney has reasonably advanced on behalf of the client."

(B) The contract for representation of a client in a matter set forth in subdivision (f)(4) may provide for a contingent fee arrangement as agreed upon by the client and the lawyer, except as limited by the following provisions:

(i) Without prior court approval as specified below, any contingent fee that exceeds the following standards shall be presumed, unless rebutted, to be clearly excessive:
a. Before the filing of an answer or the demand for appointment of arbitrators or, if no answer is filed or no demand for appointment of arbitrators is made, the expiration of the time period provided for such action:

1. 33 1/3% of any recovery up to $1 million; plus
2. 30% of any portion of the recovery between $1 million and $2 million; plus
3. 20% of any portion of the recovery exceeding $2 million.

b. After the filing of an answer or the demand for appointment of arbitrators or, if no answer is filed or no demand for appointment of arbitrators is made, the expiration of the time period provided for such action, through the entry of judgment:

1. 40% of any recovery up to $1 million; plus
2. 30% of any portion of the recovery between $1 million and $2 million; plus
3. 20% of any portion of the recovery exceeding $2 million.

c. If all defendants admit liability at the time of filing their answers and request a trial only on damages:

1. 33 1/3% of any recovery up to $1 million; plus
2. 20% of any portion of the recovery between $1 million and $2 million; plus
3. 15% of any portion of the recovery exceeding $2 million.
d. An additional 5% of any recovery after institution of any appellate proceeding is filed or post-judgment relief or action is required for recovery on the judgment.

The entire list of regulations governing Florida lawyers can be found at:
http://www.floridabar.org/divexe/rrtfb.nsf/FV/A8644F215162F9DE85257164004C0429


The cruise line lawsuits found on Cruise Laws are not intended to provide legal advice on maritime law. Cruise laws is for cruising research only, providing actual, unedited court case documents, accessed via the Freedom Of Information Act and are provided without commentary, opinion or judgement. Cases posted are not intended to point blame at any person or entity and may not show the final judgement nor appeals placed after initial judgement in any particular case. The court case documents provided within Cruise Laws are for historical, public awareness of the issues facing the cruise industry, cruise ship passengers and cruise ship crew members. Current and past case documents which may tell more of the facts in a case, can be found in other court documents. Due diligence with further research in a case is required by the visitor in order to decide who is really at fault (if anyone) in a particular case. All cases provided were filed by qualified legal professionals and are the exact wording in their filings, without modification of any kind by Cruise Laws.